Discrepancy Sheet

Discrepancy Sheet

For these Radio Pros, Amateur Radio Offers Enjoyment

Posted by Dave Sarkies

Ham Operator ParkingIt’s no surprise that many broadcast engineers are also amateur radio enthusiasts. The concept of sending out a signal and communicating with people around the globe combined with the ability to tinker with gear and tweak that signal makes for an exciting mix for radio technicians, electrical engineers and others the world over.

It may also come as no surprise that we’ve got a few amateur radio operators within the ranks of The Telos Alliance. Chief Science Officer Greg Shay, KD8WLN, Telos Systems Vice President Kirk Harnack, KD5FYD and Support Specialist Ted Alexander, W8IXY are proud to be ‘hams,’ and each has a unique perspective on the hobby.

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Topics: Amateur Radio

Found in the Attic: Sencore DVM-56A Microranger

Posted by Dave Sarkies

Sencore DVM 56-AA better title for this month's technical missive might be "Found on the Workbench", because that's where this item has lived for the past 30 years. When it was introduced in the early 1980s, the Sencore DVM-56 was a milestone device. It was one of the first DVMs to feature autoranging, thanks to the marriage of voltmeter and microprocessor technologies. No more constant fiddling with the range switch, remembering units of measurement, or where the decimal point goes. Other nice features were a programmable dB function, peak-to-peak, average and true RMS AC ranges, peak and null indicators and switch-selectable resolution of 3, 4 or 4 ½ digits. Resistances could be measured up to the unheard of range of 100 megohms and greater by paralleling a 90 meg resistor across the input terminals and using the Hi Power Ohms function.

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Topics: Vintage Radio Technology

Found in the Attic: GE BM-1-A FM monitor

Posted by Tom Vernon

GE FM monitorDuring the golden age of radio, all of America's largest electronics manufacturers were engaged, as there was lots of money and prestige to be had building broadcast equipment. RCA, Raytheon, Westinghouse and General Electric were all big players. By the 1960s, the AM and FM expansions were pretty much over. One by one, these big firms got out of broadcasting, often to pursue more lucrative government contracts as the war in Vietnam escalated.

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Topics: Vintage Radio Technology

Found in the Attic: Pioneer SR-202 Spring Reverb

Posted by Tom Vernon

Pioneer SR-202From the earliest days of high fidelity in the 1930s, the goal of equipment designers was to create a listening experience almost like having a front-row seat in a concert hall. As technology evolved, frequency response was extended to the theoretical limits, noise and distortion were reduced, and recording technologies were improved. Another avenue for recreating a live listening experience is reverberation; this month's Found in the Attic looks at a 1971 Pioneer SR-202 spring reverb.

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Topics: Vintage Technology

Hamvention 2014: Dayton Welcomes Amateur Radio Buffs

Posted by Dave Sarkies

Hamvention 2014Held each May in Southwest Ohio, the Dayton Hamvention is considered to be the premier Amateur Radio convention in North America. Telos' Ted Alexander  a veteran of forty Hamventions – provided us with some insight into this year's show, held May 16-18 at Dayton's Hara Arena.

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Topics: Amateur Radio

About Discrepancy Sheet

The lighter side of our industry, including historical tidbits, profiles of broadcast audio pros and stories of old gear that may be gathering dust in your attic.

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