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Blog Central

The Quest for the Perfect Control Room

Posted by Paul Randall Dickerson on Feb 22, 2017 2:45:00 AM

The arrangement of equipment in radio studio control rooms was often the result of a tussle between programmers and engineers. In one extreme, the control room may have been a dream for jocks to operate, but a nightmare for techs to service. Too far the other way, and you had a setup that could be easily serviced, but required an octopus to operate. Most were a compromise (although some would be better termed a stalemate).

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Topics: Radio History, Studio Technology, Broadcast Engineering

A Studio Full of Sweet Gear

Posted by Dave Sarkies on Feb 24, 2016 12:30:00 PM

As Station Manager at God’s Way Radio in Miami, an Internet radio station owned by Calvary Chapel of Miami, Joey Alcala is frequently involved in a host of projects at any one time. As a result, anything that makes his job a little easier is welcome. It’s for this reason that Joey is so happy with the setup of Telos Alliance gear in the God’s Way studios.

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Topics: Studio Technology

AoIP in a Nutshell

Posted by Tom Vernon on Jan 28, 2016 3:00:00 PM

If you travel to Fremont, Nebraska and tour the studios of Walnut Radio's KHUB 1340 AM and KFMT 105.5 FM, you won't see very much equipment; just a console, three computer screens, and a few microphones in each room. But that's a good thing. Chief Engineer Tom Russell designed it that way for several reasons. “It gives the studios a clean look, it eliminates fan noise and is just easier for our operators to work in.” He adds that all the stations' programming comes from automation, voice tracking, or live announcements.

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Topics: Studio Technology

Disaster Planning for the Studio

Posted by John Bisset on Jun 11, 2014 1:52:00 PM

Last time, we covered a number of general planning tips in preparation for disasters. When the disaster strikes is not the time to develop a plan. First on our list of suggestions is hardening your studio site. Should the studio site fail, do you have an off-site backup facility?

If not, think remote truck! Should you lose your studio facility, a remote truck can be pressed into service to keep you on the air. Prior to predictable weather emergencies, keep the truck fluids topped off.

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Topics: Radio, Studio Technology