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Blog Central

What is IEEE BTS?

Posted by Dave Sarkies on Sep 9, 2015 10:19:00 AM

The 2015 IEEE Broadcast Symposium will be held next month in Orlando, Florida. The symposium is one of the premier technical conferences on broadcast technology, and this year's program offers tutorials and technical sessions, as well as the opportunity to network with broadcast engineers from across the globe. Many of these broadcast engineering experts will be on hand to present, including our own Greg Shay and Dr. Barry Blesser.

Recently we sat down for an interview with Paul Shulins of Greater Media Boston, a Broadcast Symposium committee member, to find out more about IEEE and the IEEE Broadcast Technology Society, as well more details on this year's event.

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Topics: Technology

Quick! To the Fallout Shelter!

Posted by Jim Kuzman on Mar 25, 2015 4:45:00 PM

Ask anyone what they think of first when they hear “Las Vegas” and they’re likely to mention the retina-searing lights of the famous Vegas strip, the dazzling casinos, the over-the-top luxury hotels, the glitzy shows, and if they’re old enough, maybe even the Rat Pack at The Sands.

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Topics: Technology

Hunting Robots and Cranking it Up

Posted by Tom Vernon on Oct 8, 2014 10:00:00 PM

In this edition, we focus on some technical tips regarding Telos Zephyr and Nx Phone Systems.

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Topics: Technology

Beware the FUD Monster

Posted by Marty Sacks on Jun 10, 2014 2:07:00 PM

With more radio stations contemplating Audio-over-IP as an audio infrastructure, one statement made by certain equipment manufacturers goes something like this: “You know, if you buy that gear, a PC is required to run your AoIP network.”

In the sales trade (and let’s be honest, that’s what this is all about), this sort of statement falls under a special designation called “FUD” – Fear, Uncertainty and Doubt. Some folks make these sorts of statements in order to distract you from the fact that their systems have nothing better to offer than their competitors, by implying that there’s a horrible fault in their competitor’s gear. In this case, the implication is that a PC attached to the system somehow makes it unreliable for broadcast.

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Topics: Technology

Celebrating 45 Years of Mousing Around

Posted by Tom Vernon on Jul 28, 2013 3:24:00 PM

All Hail the Ur-MouseWe write in praise of the humble computer mouse – or, more accurately, the mind that invented it. Dr. Douglas Engelbart, working with ARPA at the Stanford Research Center in Palo Alto, California, was the man who first conceived of and publicly demonstrated digital - that is, hand-motion - control of computing devices, in December, 1968.

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Topics: Electronics, Technology

RIP John Karlin, Father of Modern Telephone Dialing

Posted by Tom Vernon on Feb 4, 2013 4:00:00 PM

At Telos, phones are, quite naturally, rather dear to our hearts. Just days ago came the news that John Karlin, a veteran of Bell Labs and the man directly responsible for All-Digit Dialing and, indirectly, DTMF and the modern telephone keypad, passed away on January 28 at the age of 94. Without Karlin, much of the UI common to modern communications would likely come in a much different form.

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Topics: Telos Systems, Technology, Vintage Technology

Inside Telos: A Chat with Marty Sacks

Posted by Tom Vernon on Nov 6, 2012 10:22:00 AM

All of us at the Telos Alliance share with our clients a fatal attraction to radio, as well as a passion for making great audio. But that's not all we do. Many of us have other hobbies and interests that might surprise you. From time to time, we'll profile members of the Telos Alliance and what they do when they're not inventing the next generation of broadcast audio gear.

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Topics: Technology

Behind the Doors of an EM Testing lab

Posted by Tom Vernon on Apr 9, 2012 2:02:00 PM

Inside the EM Testing Laboratory at Riga Technical University

As everyone knows, broadcast equipment is subject to stringent electrical immunity and electromagnetic compatibility regulations. After all, you can't have EM flying willy-nilly around a radio or TV studio without causing adverse effects - either to the broadcast material, or to its human producers! International standards for EM (or RF, if you prefer) emissions are set by the IEC, and must be strictly adhered to. And although it goes without saying that manufacturers must test all equipment they produce to ensure that its EM emissions are within those standards, most folks have no idea of how this is done.

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Topics: Radio Technology, Technology

The Beauty of Uncommon Things

Posted by Tom Vernon on Mar 12, 2012 6:52:00 PM

Those of you who might have studied film-making have likely heard of Ralph Steiner, an influential photographer and documentarian from the 1930s through the 1960s. His work was characterized by use of unusual angles and odd, but beautiful, subjects, some of which were mechanical devices and their workings. One of these is the subject of this month's Discrepancy Sheet: a 1930 short film titled "Mechanical Principles." In 10 minutes, Steiner captures the intelligence and beauty in the design of reciprocating parts, intermeshing gears, eccentric cams and other mechanisms designed to perform their tasks elegantly and repetitively. This short film is a fascinating look at the mechanical world in a pre-solid-state age - view it by clicking here. Some of Steiner's photographs are also on display at New York's Museum of Modern Art.

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Topics: Technology

Vintage Tech: Cathode Ray Tubes and a Buick Straight-8

Posted by Tom Vernon on Feb 10, 2012 6:56:00 PM

If you've been reading our content long enough, you know that we love old broadcast tech. There's nothing like watching something made in the Streamline Moderne era make broadcast media from, as Spock once opined, "stone knives and bearskins."

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Topics: Technology