<img height="1" width="1" alt="" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=311512539006924&amp;ev=NoScript">
  • Telos Alliance
  • Telos
  • Omnia
  • Axia
  • Linear Acoustics
  • twntyfive-seven
  • Minnetonka Audio

Blog Central

Found in the Attic: Hallicrafters S-20 'Sky Champion' receiver

Posted by Tom Vernon on Jul 19, 2016 10:29:00 PM

This installment of Found in the Attic examines the Hallicrafters S-20 'Sky Champion' receiver. The 'Sky Champion' line was the company's' mid-priced communications receiver.   Introduced in 1938, the S-20 was replaced by the S-20R in 1939. Since it was in production for less than a year, these receivers are somewhat rare.

There are several differences between the S-20 and S-20R. The S-20 primarily used tubes with grid caps, while the later S-20R used newer replacements. Tube lineup for the S-20 includes: 6K7, RF stage; 6L7, 1st detector-mixer; 6J5, HF osc; 6K7, IF amp; 6Q7, 2nd detector-AVC-1st audio stage; 6F6, audio out; 6J5, BFO and 80, rectifier.

Read More

Topics: Vintage Electronics, Vintage Audio Technology

Found in the Attic: Zenith Allegro Modular Stereo

Posted by Tom Vernon on Jun 14, 2016 10:00:00 AM

The 1970s saw the music industry grow in to a multi-billion dollar business. This explosive growth was one of the driving forces behind a comparable expansion in consumer electronics, and in particular, hi-fi gear.

Component stereo gear was the bread and butter of companies such as Pioneer, Marantz and Denon. Consumers could purchase tuners, amps and tape decks at a price point they could afford, and upgrade as new technology and/or larger paychecks became available. At the other end of the spectrum were modular stereo systems. These devices usually had all of the above components, along with a turntable, in one chassis. Since all of the electronics were usually on a single motherboard, and there was only one chassis, they could be manufactured fairly inexpensively. There were two varieties of modular stereos. The large cabinet systems found in virtually every living room during the 1970s was one type, and there were also tabletop units.

Read More

Topics: Vintage Electronics

Found in the Attic: NuTone 2067B-2068B Transistor Radio-Intercom System

Posted by Tom Vernon on May 24, 2016 4:00:00 PM

Radios come in all shapes and sizes, and this column seeks out some of the forgotten and unusual examples. Previous installments have examined farm radios, unlikely portables and early clock radios. This time around, we'll look at the NuTone 2067B transistor radio intercom system. It dates to 1965, when home radio-intercoms were something of a status symbol in larger houses.

These systems enabled users to play music through any or all of the up to ten intercom stations throughout the house. In addition to the AM-FM radio, records or tapes could be played via the external input jack. The intercom portion enabled room-to-room communication, plus the ability to answer the door, if there was an outdoor intercom station. Also, the home intercom could be connected to a NuTone doorbell chime, so the chimes could be audible through the intercom stations.

Read More

Topics: Vintage Radio Technology, Vintage Electronics

Found in the Attic: Stanton RM-THREE Disco Mixer

Posted by Tom Vernon on Apr 19, 2016 11:30:00 PM

The Stanton RM-THREE disco mixer is such a recent device that it almost doesn't qualify as a Found in the Attic item, even though that is where it has lived for the past decade. It dates from the late 1990s. This Stanton, along with its successor, the RM-3S, have long been out of production. But it recalls the purpose-built disco mixers, and a time when the turntable began its transition from a device to playback recorded media into a creative tool in its own right.

Read More

Topics: Vintage Electronics, Vintage Audio Technology

Found in the Attic: Radio Down on the Farm

Posted by Tom Vernon on Feb 18, 2016 9:34:48 PM

This episode of Found in the Attic features a 1940 tabletop radio with a twist. This Philco model 40-90 is a farm radio. Although they were an important part of radio history, these radios are largely forgotten today.

When radio came on the scene in the 1920s, it was the first mass media. It brought Americans together as never before. Suddenly, geographic boundaries didn't matter. Once the sun went down, clear channel AM radio stations sent their signals coast to coast.

Read More

Topics: Vintage Electronics

Found in the Attic: Uher 4000

Posted by Tom Vernon on Dec 28, 2015 1:40:33 PM

Back in the days when every radio station worth its salt had a news department, broadcast equipment catalogs had a section for remote news gathering equipment. Included were items like the indestructible EV-635A microphone, mic flags, NiCad batteries and chargers, telephone couplers and of course, portable recorders.

Read More

Topics: Vintage Electronics

Found in the Attic: Unlikely Portables

Posted by Tom Vernon on Dec 28, 2015 12:07:04 PM

The advent of the transistor made radio a truly put-it-in-your-pocket device. The earlier suitcase radios of the 1940s got radio out of the living room, but weren't really portable by today's standards. The first transistor radios were AM receivers. As the technology improved, short wave bands, and then FM were added to the mix. By the mid-1970s, AM-FM portables of various sizes and styles were ubiquitous. There were also radios with other bands included. These were never hugely popular, but they are still an interesting chapter in the history of portable radios. This Found in the Attic is a twofer, and features the Lafayette Radio Electronics Guardian 11 and the Panasonic RF-1104.

Read More

Topics: Vintage Electronics

Found in the Attic: OS-8/U Oscilloscope

Posted by Tom Vernon on Oct 5, 2015 1:16:24 PM

From the time that oscilloscopes were first developed in the early 1940s, the race was on to make them smaller. Originally, scopes were esoteric devices found only in research labs, but servicing applications quickly surfaced. They eventually began to appear in radio-TV repair shops.

Read More

Topics: Vintage Electronics

Found in the Attic: Ampex TU-40 Flutter Meter

Posted by Tom Vernon on Jul 17, 2015 2:31:21 PM

In the digital age of WAV files and hard drives, sound appears as if by magic from a PC or iPhone. But it wasn't that long ago that audio reproduction involved something going around, be it a turntable platter, tape or cassette reel, cart hub, or film reel.

Read More

Topics: Vintage Electronics

Found in the Attic: Heath IT-28 Capacitor Checker

Posted by Tom Vernon on Jul 13, 2015 3:43:00 PM

This edition of Found in the Attic might better be called Found on the Workbench, because that is where this item lives. The Heathkit IT-28 capacitor checker is an incredibly useful device, particularly when working on vintage gear. Most modern test equipment, even inexpensive items, can run circles around older test and measurement devices. But there are a few items that have a timeless design that enables them to thrive in the digital age. The IT-28 is one of them; there are things you can do with it that can't be done with digital devices. Of course, the IT-28 is a vintage device itself, dating from the late 1960s.

Read More

Topics: Vintage Electronics